fia-logoJust a few minutes ago, news reports have emerged that the governing body the FIA is introducing a voluntary budget cap of £30 million into the sport to encourage new teams to enter into F1.

It is thought the budget cap is entirely voluntary, giving the new teams open access to all the technological advancements that their less frugal counterparts have near bankrupted themselves developing at great expense.

FIA President Max Mosley has suggested the budget cap will encourage all the teams to get clever with their engineering, which can be translated as meaning F1 engineers are going to start engaging in the practice of foraging through other peoples mini-skips looking for useful treasures.

According to the reports the £30 million proposed figure incorporates all costs for running an F1 team, including paying the wages of all the team plus the drivers.

We do wonder how the likes of McLaren, Ferrari, Renault and co may react to the news, given that a £30 million yearly budget probably scarcely covers the pocket money expenses of one of their drivers, nevermind any actual technology.

Will McLaren be able to afford Lewis Hamilton’s popstar entourage? Can Ferrari meet Kimi’s bar tab? Can Renault afford to buy Flavio a new thong? Will Britney Rosberg ever afford a haircut? Will the teams start racing lawnmower engines instead?

not-impressed-colajanniMeanwhile, it would appear the WMSC has ratified plans to make F1 drivers more accessible to the general public and the media. It is understood drivers are going to be required to attend autograph sessions during first practice on a grand prix weekend as well as making themselves more available to the media if they are not attending the FIA official press conferences.

It is thought this piece of alarming news has come as somewhat of a shock to Ferrari’s official media representative and spokesman Luca Colajanni, who has been carted off to lie down in a dark room to ward off an impending migraine triggered by all the extra “for sures” he is going to have to translate over the course of the year.

In addition to introducing a budget cap, and forcing Kimi to mumble in the company of journalists more than is strictly necessary, it seems the FIA have made some minimal rule changes with regards to the points system.

Instead of accepting proposed changes to the points themselves for 2009, the FIA has introduced a new rule that the driver who has gained the most wins during the course of the season will go home with the spoils of war and a few bottle of fizzy pop to boot, while someone who has scored more points but less overall wins goes home sobbing uncontrollably….presumably.

What does all this mean for the future of our beloved sport? answers on a postcard please!

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